Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Laurel Leaf Scarf ~ Free Crochet Pattern & Tutorial

Way back in 2010, I was contacted by a small publishing company and asked to contribute a crochet pattern to an e-booklet, the proceeds of which would benefit the Los Angeles Mission. This was the result:

The Laurel Leaf Scarf

Now, two and a half years later, the e-booklet is no longer available and the publishing contract has expired - so I'm happy to offer the Laurel Leaf Scarf as February's free pattern.
(If you do make this scarf, would you consider also making a small donation to the charity of your choice, to honour the pattern's original intent? It's entirely up to you, of course.)
Enough business. Let's talk crochet!


The Laurel Leaf Scarf is lacy and quick, and very easy to make. It starts as a long central band (complete with handy spaces along its length just begging for a decorative edging), and finishes with a single round of linked chains and triple-crochet-cluster leaves, with picots for extra beauty.

We'll start with a simplified chart, then move on to the crochet shorthand pattern, and finish with a video tutorial and instructions in plain English.

Size: 60" x approx. 4" (may easily be made longer or shorter by changing the length of the core band)

Yarn Requirements:
About 200-225 yards of a Medium (#4) weight yarn
(Pattern will work with any weight yarn, but width will be different depending on yarn used)

Yarn(s) I Used:
Stitch Nation Bamboo Ewe, color Grape
Yarn Bee Princess, color Ballgown

How Did the Yarns Behave?
Both my yarns were on the bulky side of medium, which made for a more substantive scarf. Bamboo Ewe is delightful to work with - silky-soft and drapey - but can flatten out dreadfully if wet-blocked. If using this yarn, spritz lightly to block. Yarn Bee Princess (chosen for a friend with possible wool allergies) is a craft-store yarn with a soft cushiony hand and a subtle shiny filament running through the twist. It stands up well to wet-blocking (as seen in this post).

Hook Size:
(Blogger hangs head in shame and reluctantly admits that she can't remember what hook sizes she used.)
Choose a hook size that is appropriate to your yarn.
Tip: Make a small swatch to determine best hook size(s). You may want to switch to a smaller hook for the border.

All crochet terminology is American.



Special stitches used:

Stretched 3-triple crochet cluster (st3tr-cl) - *Yo twice; insert hook in ch-4 sp, yo, draw up loop; yo, draw through 2 loops on hook (twice). Repeat from * twice more = 3 partial triple crochets (4 loops left on hook). Yo, draw through 2 loops, yo, draw through all 3 loops on hook.

Picot with hdc (always made on top of st3tr-cl): Ch 3. Attach to top of cluster with half-double crochet (RS facing, yo, insert hook from front to back under top 2 strands of  cluster; yo, draw up loop, yo, draw through all loops on hook).  This stitch may feel awkward at first, because you're twisting the hook down, back, and to the right to get under the strands, but you'll soon get used to it.

Laurel Leaf Scarf Charted Pattern




Please note: See pattern below for instructions on linked leaves.

Laurel Leaf Scarf Crochet Shorthand Pattern

Scarf Core:
Ch 7, join with sc in first ch. Ch 4, turn. Dc 2 in sc, sc in ch-7 sp. *Ch 4, turn. Dc 2 in sc, sc in previous ch-4 sp. Repeat from * until you reach desired length.

Alternate band for heavier yarns (optional): Replace ch-4s with ch-5s and use treble crochets instead of double crochets.

Leaf Edging:
First Leaf: Ch 5. Do not turn; you will be working down the side of the scarf. In next ch-4 sp, st3tr-cl,  picot w/hdc (see Special Stitches, above), ch 5, sc in same ch-4 sp. First leaf complete. RS now facing; all leaves will be made with RS facing.

Second and remaining (Linked) Leaves: **Ch 1, sc in next ch-4 sp. Remove hook from yarn loop, put tip of hook from front to back through previous ch-5 leaf sp, and insert hook back into loop. (Or you can slide yarn loop to the base of hook, put base of hook from back to front through the ch-5 leaf space, and slide yarn loop back up to top of hook.) Working with ch-5 in front of hook, ch 2, then bring hook with yarn loop under and just to the right of the ch-5; ch 1, catching ch-5 in stitch; ch 2 (5 chains total). St3tr-cl in same ch-4 sp, picot w/hdc, ch 5, sc in same ch-4 sp. Linked leaf made.**

Repeat from ** to ** until you reach the end of the scarf. Make 2 linked leaves in the beginning ch-7 sp (be sure to ch 1, sc between them), then continue up the other side of scarf, making 1 linked leaf in each ch-4 sp until you reach the other end. Make 2 linked leaves in ch-4 sp at end of scarf, ending with picot of second leaf.

Finishing: Attach the final leaf to the first leaf as follows: Cut yarn, leaving a 10-12” tail. Ch 2. Holding working yarn behind scarf, insert hook from front to back between next ch-5 and next cluster. Sl st around ch-5. End of yarn is now behind work. Pull yarn end through the ch-5 space to front of work. Ch 2; sc between final sc of band and first cluster of border. And you’re done!

Tie off, weave in ends, and block scarf (blocking will tame those curly leaves.) Enjoy.


Laurel Leaf Scarf Video Tutorial with Instructions in Plain English

Be sure to read "Special Stitches" above before starting pattern.

Scarf Core:

Chain 7, join with single crochet in first chain.
Chain 4, turn. Double crochet 2 in single crochet, single crochet in chain-7 space.
*Chain 4, turn. Double crochet 2 in single crochet at base of chain-4, single crochet in previous chain-4 space. Repeat from * until you reach desired length.

Alternate band for heavier yarns (optional): Replace chain-4s with chain-5s and use treble crochets instead of double crochets.


Leaf Edging:
First Leaf: Chain 5. Do not turn; you will be working down the side of the scarf.
In next chain-4 space, make a Stretched 3-treble cluster,
then a picot w/half double crochet (see Special Stitches, above),
chain 5,
single crochet in same chain-4 space.
First leaf made.

This is the right side of the scarf; all leaves will be made with the right side facing you.

Second and remaining (Linked) Leaves:
**Chain 1, single crochet in next chain-4 space.
Remove hook from working loop, put tip of hook from front to back through previous chain-5 leaf space, and insert hook back into loop. (Or you can slide yarn loop to the base of hook, put base of hook from back to front through the chain-5 leaf space, and slide yarn loop back up to top of hook. See video #2 if you find this hopelessly confusing.)
With chain-5 in front of hook, chain 2, then bring hook with yarn loop under and just to the right of the chain-5;
chain 1, catching chain-5 in stitch;
chain 2 (5 chains total).
Make a Stretched 3-treble cluster in same chain-4 space,
picot w/half double crochet,
chain 5,
single crochet in same chain-4 space.**
Linked leaf made.

Repeat from ** to ** until you reach the opposite end of the scarf.
Make 2 linked leaves in the beginning chain-7 space (don't forget to chain 1, single crochet between the 2 leaves), then continue up the other side of scarf, making 1 linked leaf in each chain-4 space until you reach the other end.
Make 2 linked leaves in chain-4 space at other end of scarf, ending with picot on the second (or final) leaf.


Finishing:
Attach the final leaf to the first leaf as follows:
Cut yarn, leaving a 10-12” tail.
Chain 2.
Holding working yarn behind scarf, insert hook from front to back between next chain-5 and next cluster.
Slip stitch around chain-5.
End of yarn is now behind work. Pull yarn end through the chain-5 space to front of work.
Chain 2;
single crochet between original single crochet and original cluster.
And you’re done! :)


Tie off, weave in ends, and block scarf  (blocking will tame those curly leaves.) Enjoy.

You may do whatever you like with the items you make from this pattern, but you may not sell or re-post the pattern.

Thanks for viewing, and happy crocheting!


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24 comments:

  1. Oh boy, another amazing pattern Sue. Its beautiful, I especially love the picots. Unfortunately I just don't have the time and probably patience to crochet anything more detailed than granny squares and simple scarves and gloves. However,I do know where to come when I will have the time one day :o) Thanks so much for sharing. Such a worthy cause too xox Hope your week is good and you are over all your ills x P

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    1. Thanks, Penelope! This is actually a pretty simple scarf and works up really quickly in a larger yarn. :)

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  2. Gorgeous scarf!Love purple color!Thanks so much for sharing pattern!
    Have a fabulous week!
    Hugs from Portugal,

    Ana Love Craft
    www.lovecraft2012.blogspot.com

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    1. Thank you, Ana. I hope your winter has been a pleasant one. :)

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  3. I had that purple yarn in my hands last week, but I didn't have a pattern in mind so I put it back. I am going to go and get that yarn.
    Great tutorial as always. And another must try on my list. :0

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    1. It is the prettiest shade of saturated grape - I just love the colour. You need this yarn. (There - no stash guilt now.) :)

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  4. I SO love your floral scarves...and this is no exception...Beautiful!

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    1. Thanks so much, Ana! It was fun to see the scarf again. I had it in storage all this time - but now I'm wearing it. :)

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  5. It's beautiful Sue, I have pinned it for later, thank you so much for the pattern :)

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  6. I don't wear scarves, but this is beautiful Sue.

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    1. Thanks, Ann. I never used to wear scarves either until I started designing them. Now I really like them. :)

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  7. I made several of your flowering clematis scarves and I have loved them and the recipients have love them as well. This one rivals that pattern and I may need to give it a go!

    Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Thanks Liz - I was thinking of you when I posted the pattern. I had a feeling you might like this one too. :)

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    2. Thank you so much Sue. It makes me feel so good that you thought of me. I made it and I love it! See this post for the reveal: http://appleblossomdreams.blogspot.com/2013/03/the-pink-scarf-project-meets-mr-micawber.html

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    3. It's gorgeous! What an honour for my little pattern. :)

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  8. I just found you via Pinterest and am amazed at your beautiful patterns! I am having a hard time choosing which to do first! Thank you for sharing your incredible talent with us!

    New follower here!

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    1. Thank you and welcome! If you have questions about, or need help with, any of the patterns please feel free to ask. :)

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  9. What a fascinating process. thankk you for sharing this amazing crochet pattern

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  10. The photos of this are so beautiful, but I have to say I really enjoyed seeing it in person today and touching it. What a neat way to get a pattern published, a good cause, and now it's back to being yours!

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    1. Thanks Deb, as always. It was GREAT to see you again. Hugs! :)

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  11. I love this pattern. I remember asking you on raverly if you could do a tutorial for this, and I am happy to see that you have. I tried working up the scarf core on my lunch break today, and am embarrassed to say that I am somehow messing up between with placing my single crochets... and understanding where and what I am supposed to crochet. I am a beginner crocheter, but I had no problem with the Queen Anne's Lace scarf, not the case with this one. =/ I thought looking at the drawn pattern would help, and it did for the second one, but not for the third. I will try again when I get home.

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  12. Love this scarf pattern, I reblogged one of your pictures and a link to your pattern, here on your blog, as part of a compilation of beautiful crochet scarf patterns. This is on my to do list to at Ralvery and when my scarf is completed you may use the pictures that I post as you please. Keep designing amazing and beautiful work.

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