Thursday, October 11, 2012

In Which Politics Are Mentioned for the First, and Probably the Last, Time

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"Ah, Susan, have you heard the news? The Liberals are in."

Susan had just come in from the kitchen, attended by the odour of delectable dishes which always seemed to hover around her.

"Now, are they?" she said, with beautiful unconcern. "Well, I never could see but that my bread rose just as light when Grits were in as when they were not. And if any party, Mrs. Doctor, dear, will make it rain before the week is out, and save our kitchen garden from entire ruination, that is the party Susan will vote for."*

I'm with Susan.**

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*Anne's House of Dreams, L.M. Montgomery

**A few weeks of warm weather to ripen the tomatoes would buy my vote. :)

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24 comments:

  1. Have you ever tried making green tomato chutney with those last tomatoes which just can't turn red?
    I love the unconcerned attitude of Susan in the excerpt you have given above!!

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    1. These aren't the last tomatoes ... I have only picked 2 or 3 of these so far this year. The bush is COVERED with green fruit (which came on very late)! I'm doing my best to nurse them along, but green tomato chutney may have to be their fate....

      :)

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  2. cute tomatoes! i had the same last year in out kitchen garden:) all the best!

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  3. Hello Sue!

    I have noticed a glut of green tomato posts recently - although this one is quite unique, of course - and an equal dose of green tomato chutney offered as a natural solution.

    I love the Anne books with a passion.

    Stephanie

    ps Although it is NOT the promised Baroque oboe post my latest blatherings on my blog include an introduction to this instrument.

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    1. So my tomatoes aren't the only dilatory ones.... And I love the Anne books too (re-read them every other year or so).

      Your post was great fun. :)

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  4. -sigh- Oh yes, I do like 'Susan's' attitude. :-)

    Mine is to do what I can, and then, put politics aside. Worrying and fussing over such, will do nothing constructive. But it WILL ruin my day. Silly me, to do that, me-thinks. :-)

    "Auntie"

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    1. That's all anyone can do. And in a month or so, it will all be over, bar the analysis. Until next time. :)

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    1. Hear, hear! Susans of the world, unite! :)

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  6. Amen! Someone suggested that because Ohio, North Carolina, Virginia and Florida will determine the election that all the campaigning should take place there and leave the rest of us alone.

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    1. I love reading Anthony Trollope's political novels, partly to revel in the fact that campaigning in his era only took place in the few days before the election. Ah, simpler times. :)

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  7. Oh my goodness that is hilarious. I'm with Mac. I'd like to say that they leave the rest of us alone here in Utah; however...there is much hub bub going on here, too. I'll vote for anyone that makes the final tomato harvesting day a national paid holiday. :-)

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    1. Ooh, I like that idea. And since there are tomatoes practically year-round somewhere in the States, it could be a very long holiday. :)

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  8. I came to you via Stephanie and am glad to have found you. I spent years fascinated by politics but am slowly finding that I may be intellectually interested in how politicians can affect us but I have no patience any more for the attempt to explain life through one very narrow looking glass. Susan had it right.

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    1. I think so too. In the same chapter, the author refers to party politics as a virulent microbe. It's a wonderful description.

      Thanks for commenting! :)

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  9. With beautiful unconcern (my God, I love that statement) I am going to bake bread.
    Love to you.
    I am going to repeat, "With beautiful unconcern" forever.
    That lovely phrase applies to so much.
    Have a lovely weekend.

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    1. You too, e! :)

      And it IS a lovely phrase. I do so admire L.M. Montgomery's writing. No one can touch her for down-to-earth humor and amazing descriptions of the beauties of Nature.

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  10. Hello Mrs M.
    Well what can I say other than thank you for intoducing me to this book, I shall be putting it on my list. As for "beautiful unconcern" well, this delighted me no end. Perfect form of disregard I think :o)
    Thank you for your comment onmy blog, I hope it wasn't too dark, it was just what i was feeling. My mum and dad still live in South Africa and I am acutely aware of each day being precious. Take care, big hugs and lets pray fro ripening of those toms xox Penelope

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    1. Thanks Penelope - the book is one of the "Anne of Green Gables" series, all of which I can heartily recommend. And no, your post wasn't dark at all - just real. :)

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  11. Nov. 14th...

    Oh I bet you would again enjoy books by Gladys Taber, if you can get your hands on them! I'm sure you would resonate with her lovely observations of nature and homemaking and etc.

    Old observations they may be. But many things never change. Many things stay true, year after year after year. :-))))

    "Auntie"

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    1. Thanks for the reminder, Auntie! I'll see if the library system still has them. And I love old books. Most of my favourites are way older than I am. :)

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  12. That is SO funny and timely!!! And those 'matoes need to hurry up and grow before they lose their opportunity!!!

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    1. Darn right they do ... I'm tenderly covering them every night and giving them the best shot I can, but their days are numbered. :)

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