Friday, August 2, 2013

Summery Cowl - A Free Pattern Featuring Wide Linked Treble Crochet


Now that you've conquered Wide Linked Treble Crochet, how about using it for a quick and lovely summery cowl? (What? You missed the wltr tutorial? Click here for a refresher.)

  • Use any yarn you like, with the appropriate hook size. For an open, drapey fabric, use a larger hook than recommended for yarn (but keep the tension firm).
  • Ending edge should be worked with a hook 1 or 2 sizes smaller.
  • Cowl is worked flat, lengthwise, then seamed after blocking.
  • My cowl was made with Deborah Norville Serenity Garden Yarn by Premier, colour Mountain Heather, and a 5.5mm hook (ending edge was stitched with a 4.25mm hook).
Here's a quick review of the main stitch (click here for an in-depth stitch tutorial):

Wide Linked Treble Crochet (wltr) - *Yo, ins hook into left vertical strand of center segment of previous st, pull up a lp, ch 1, ins hook into left vertical strand of bottom segment of previous st, pull up a lp, ch 1, ins hook into 2nd st from hook, pull up a lp, [yo, pull through 2 lps on hook] twice, yo, pull through 3 lps on hook, ch 1. Repeat from * across, omitting final ch-1 at end of row.
To start a new wltr row: Ch 5 (counts as first wltr + ch-1), turn so top of ch is facing you, yo, ins hook into back loop of 3rd ch from hook, pull up a lp, ch 1, ins hook into back loop of 2nd ch from hook, pull up a lp, ch 1, ins hook into 3rd st from hook, pull up a lp, [yo, pull through 2 lps on hook] twice, yo, pull through 3 lps on hook, ch 1. First 2 wltr made.

Summery Cowl Pattern:

Starting Decorative Edge: *Ch 2, sc in back bump of 1st ch. Rep from * to desired length of cowl.
Row 1: Wltr across, making trebles in the "holes" betw clusters of starting edge.
Following Rows: Wltr across, always working trebles into trebles from previous row, and skipping over ch-1s. Repeat wltr rows until cowl is desired width. (My cowl has 5 wltr rows.)
Ending decorative Edge: Decrease 1 or 2 hook sizes.
Ch 2, turn, ins hook into back loop of 2nd ch from hook, pull up a lp, ins hook into next treble (skipping over ch-1 between trebles), yo, pull through all lps on hook.
*Ch 2, ins hook into back bump of 2nd ch from hook, pull up a lp, ins hook into next treble (skipping over ch-1 between trebles), yo, pull through all lps on hook.
Rep from * across. Cut yarn, leaving long tail.

Block cowl while flat. After blocking, make 1/2 twist lengthwise, bring ends together, and seam. Weave in yarn ends.

Make a half-twist...

...then bring ends together.

Seam...

...turn seam to inside, and you're done!

What about a video tutorial? (I can hear you wondering.)

Here it is:


You may do whatever you like with the items you make from this stitch / pattern / tutorial, but you may not sell the pattern.

Thanks for viewing, and happy crocheting!


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P.S. To those who watch the video tutorials: do you prefer one long video, with all the pattern steps included, or several short videos, each with a different step? Let me know. And thanks. :)

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30 comments:

  1. Finally a cowl pattern that I am truly in L O V E with. You did a fabulous job on the tutorial. If I have to chose, I prefer a longer tutorial. I get tired of clicking and searching for the next tutorial in line....if you know what I mean....but it's totally up to you how you do them. Really love the yarn you used and the name of yarn even sounds beautiful!
    Hugs, ♥

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    1. Thanks very much Shari - and I am inclined towards the longer tutorial myself. :)

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  2. The cowl is awesome. Love the yarn. I think one long video works for me, but what do I know!

    Blessings always

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    1. Thanks Vicki - perhaps we should ask Mo and Jo what kind they prefer? ;)

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  3. I really love this cowl, and I have the perfect yarn for it! I will start on it right after I finish my current project.

    I prefer one long video tutorial, because they take a while to load on my Kindle, which is what I view them from. I really like your videos, it's extremely helpful to see the steps!

    Thank you for the lovely free pattern! :)

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    1. Thanks Cogaroo - I think I'll be sticking with the longer format. Looking forward to seeing your pattern! :)

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  4. It's beautiful, thank you so much for the pattern. I prefer one long video too. :)

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    1. Thanks Linda - that seems to be the consensus. :)

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  5. I've never thought of a cowl for the summer but this is just so pretty and in such lovely spring/summer colours that I may hVe to rethink. Thanks for the tutorial. I think I like the whole thing to start with and also it in bits as I arrive at the salient points. Joan

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    1. I never had thought of a cowl for summer either - but the timing happened to be perfect and it came in handy over a very chilly weekend! :)

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  6. This color combo is so mesmerizing Sue. Love the cowl!

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    1. Thanks Astri - I love the colours too. :)

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  7. Can't wait to try this! Thank you very much.

    Give Tallulah a pet for me, pleas.

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    1. You're welcome, and Tallulah says "Thank you". :)

      Thanks for commenting!

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  8. A pretty crocheted summery cowl, though it's so hot here, I can't bear anything near my neck - so I shall have to wait till autumn!

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    1. Normally I wouldn't be wearing one either at this time of year ... but the last few weeks were unseasonably cool so it all worked out!

      Thanks Sandra. :)

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  9. Oh wow, thanks for sharing this. It's beautiful. When I grow up into a good crocheter, I hope to try it one day!

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    1. Thanks so much Kay - and really it's pretty simple. I'll bet you could do it.... :)

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  10. Sue, you have blessed us all with a lovely gift. Thank you for the pattern and tutorial.
    Hugs to you,
    Meredith

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    1. Hugs back! Thank you for your always-kind words. :)

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  11. hey that is GORGEOUS. SOmetimes I do like to crochet...am adding it to my maybe list!

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    1. Thanks Kathy - I would like to see some of your crochet projects sometime. :)

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  12. Isn't the Serenity Garden lush, Sue!!! The color, drape, and feel of it is so lovely. The shawl I am making with it thanks to Teresa Kasner's encouragement, is beautiful in the making. Although I am so pokey and I find the yarn easily splits, I still love it! It is funny. I especially like to try to use natural fibers sourced nearby, but then I meet a yarn like Serenity and become completely smitten and my "standards of excellence" become much more expansive :)
    Thanks so much for sharing this beautiful pattern I really want to try to follow!!!!!!!
    Gracie xx

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    1. It is awfully splitty but you are so right about the texture. I've made three projects from Serenity Garden and they've all held up well and kept their incredible softness and drape. Who knew acrylic could be so nice? :)

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  13. I LOVE your tutorial, and how nice to hear your voice. I may not be much of a crocheter, but I am so going to try that starting chain :D

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    1. Thanks Annie - I think it could come in handy as a cast-on variation. :)

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  14. Oh, how stunning and so beautiful. You are a wonder. I want to try this too.

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  15. p.s. This just lovely, and I too love your voice. My biggest problem is in the counting of the chains. Sigh, perhaps one of these days it will click.

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    1. I don't like counting chains either - which is why I am driven to invent alternative starting rows like this one! :)

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